Vino

Joelle Thomson's online wine guide

Category: France (page 1 of 3)

An unusual tasting in Wellington… discover a great white

The world of… (insert name of white grape here), Tuesday 18 July, 6pm to 8pm, Regional Wines & Spirits, Elice Street, Wellington…

If you had to name a wine that is rare as hen’s teeth these days but was once one of the brightest stars in the New Zealand wine galaxy, what would it be?
It’s white, it originally comes from France and it used to be one of the most planted grapes in Gisborne and the biggest clue: It’s not very well known by name.

It is Chenin Blanc. And it’s the theme of one of our most complex, wide ranging tastings that we have planned this year at Regional Wines & Spirits in Wellington, where I am spending a significant portion of my week, working on tastings, among other aspects of wine.

This tasting will highlight 13 different wines from 3 different countries, 3 different French appellations and will feature bone dry, full bodied wines through to off dry, medium dry and lusciously sweet, kicking off with a fizz made from Chenin Blanc before we travel the world, one glass at a time, from warmer to cooler regions, younger to older and drier to sweeter wines. Here’s the line up.

2016 De Morgenzen, Reserve Chenin Blanc, Stellenbosch
2015 Astrolabe, Wrekin Vineyard, Chenin Blanc, Marlborough
2015 Marc Bredif, Vouvray
2014 Baumard, Clos St Yves, Savennieres
2013 Forrest Estate, Chenin Blanc, Marlborough
2012 Astrolabe, Wrekin Vineyard, Chenin Blanc, Marlborough
2007 Forrest Estate, Chenin Blanc, Marlborough
2005 Baumard, Clos St Yves, Savennières
2004 Baumard, Clos St Yves, Savennières
1999 Marc Bredif, Vouvray
2015 Baumard, Carte d’Or, Coteaux du Layon
2010 Baumard, Clos Ste Catherine, Coteaux du Layon

Bookings are essential and this tasting is already filling up as it is limited to 20 people, so please email to confirm your spot and organise payment ($40 per person represents pretty stellar value, in my view, for such an amazing bunch of wines, the majority of which are still available to buy afterwards, should the fancy take you).
Email bookings to: john@regionalwines.co.nz

Champagne and New Zealand – likenesses and differences

Every silver lining has a cloud… said a friend at our three yearly catch up dinner last year. It’s not that we only want to catch up every three years. We live in different countries. It’s just how it pans out.

And it pans out that we weren’t drinking champagne, but the silver linings  analogy sprang to mind at a tasting of Champagne Mumm late last week in Auckland. There we were, two of us writers faced with six high priced sparkling wines, 45 minutes to taste them and one travelling winemaker-marketer – Didier Mariotti from Champagne G H Mumm in France.

It wasn’t the limited time we had to taste the wines but, as often occurs to me, the price of the wines in question. Many tasted outstandingly complex but are about as affordable as a Prada suit would be to most of us right now. Still, the flavours are intriguing, especially as all of the wines go through 100% malolactic fermentation to soften their acidity and add creamy richness, which has yet to come through – showing these wines have plenty of time up their sleeves for those willing to age them to watch their development.

The wines we tasted were

Champagne Mumm Cordon Rouge $66.49
Champagne Mumm Rose $103.99
Champagne Mumm Millesime $102.99
Champagne Mumm Blanc de Blancs $210.99
Champagne Mumm R’Lalou 2002 $390 (20 cases in New Zealand)

Prices  are recommended retail and may vary.

My pick… Mumm R’Lalou 2002 $390 (20 cases in New Zealand)

There is a quantifiable step up in this wine compared to the others and Lalou was my pick, which is about to be released in New Zealand after 8 years on lees and disgorgement in 2013. This wine has high acidity, fresh creamy flavours, pastry aromas and a long finish. It is high priced, in small supply (only 20 cases for the entire country) and definitely one for the collectors.

Comparing New Zealand to Champagne…

  • The Champagne region has approximately 34,000 hectares of grapes compared to New Zealand with 36,192 hectares in total.
  • The big difference between the production of sparkling wines in both countries is, says Didier, how champagne makers manage their reserve wines. “The quality of the still wine is very good from New Zealand, as it is also from cool areas in Australia, South Africa and California where sparkling wines are made. For me, the big difference is the lack of understanding of reserve wine. I would say that reserve wine is an insurance against frost, to be able to respond fast to market demand and to increase the quality of the wine to make more consistent wine over the years. It costs a lot of money to keep back reserves. always have nearly one vintage in advance in the winery.”
  • The entire range of Mumm Champagnes contains 6 grams per litre of sweetness (dosage) apart from Mumm NV Cordon Rouge, which contains 8 grams.
  • Mumm Cramant has a super fresh taste, noticeably higher acidity and less pressure (less CO2) because it is bottled at 4.5 bars of pressure compared to 6 bars, which all the other (and most champagnes) contain. This provides the wine with its fresher taste, says Didier.

A new Champagne Mumm Blanc de Blanc and Blanc de Noir are being launched in New Zealand within the next couple of years.

The history of Mumm and Lalou

René Lalou headed up Maison Mumm for over half a century from 1920 until his death in 1973 and on two separate occasions he breathed new life into this well known Champagne brand. He rescued the vineyards after they were destroyed by phylloxera and, later, by World War Two.

For nearly 50 years, he travelled up and down vineyard rows, pulling up, re-grafting and re-planting vines, so that he reorganised the entire Champagne Mumm vineyards that, under his supervision, grew from 50 hectares to almost 100 just before WWII.

A first for NZ… vin doux naturel from Canterbury

Its name is French for naturally sweet but there is plenty that is man made about vin doux naturel wines, which have their fermentation stopped by a process called mutage.

This is the interruption of the fermentation by adding alcohol to wine when it is only part-way through its transformation from juice and grape sugars to wine and alcohol. The result is an intensely aromatic fortified wine, in this case to 17.5% ABV.

To the best of my knowledge, this is the first one ever to be produced in New Zealand and it is made by maverick North Cantabrian winemaker Guy Porter, whose whites push all sorts of tasty boundaries, including a flor yeast-influenced nutty dry white and, now, this sensation. He also makes a VDN from a blend of Gewürztraminer, Muscat and Riesling but this is my fave because I enjoy the balance of crisp acidity that Sauvignon Blanc offers in this wine:

2016 Bellbird Spring Mute L’Alouette North Canterbury

This is one bottle to stash, to enjoy, to marvel at – “wow” was my reaction when poured some at an impromptu tasting last week in Auckland. This fortified Sauvignon Blanc is modelled on southern French vin doux naturels and offers a beautiful new take on the Sauvignon Blanc theme from the thoughtful winemaking of Guy Porter at Bellbird Spring, one of the smallest wineries in New Zealand – and a name to beat a track to for anyone looking for delicious whites and tasty Pinot Noirs.

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