Vino

Top drops under $20 (and over) and wine news from Joelle Thomson

Category: Top drops over $20 (page 1 of 2)

A very humbling vineyard… Mt Ed’s Morrison

It’s not everyday you hear a winemaker talk openly about having their hopes and dreams smashed by an expert who sees their vineyard in an entirely different light to them. But, like most winemakers,  Duncan Forsyth is well used to adapting to his environment.

Not least because that environment is the world’s southernmost wine region. Frosts are standard fare at certain times of the year and the region is heavily reliant on one grape – Pinot Noir, which may be relatively early ripening, but is also thin skinned and has all the jazz and drama that goes along with anything or anyone who is thin skinned. Still, Duncan put great personal investment into the small Morrison Vineyard when he planted it entirely in Pinot Noir.

So you can imagine his surprise when the French agronomist engineer Claude Bourguignon stood on this favoured vineyard and said that “One day you will possibly make great white wine from this site.”

It was the last thing that Duncan expected to hear from Bourgignon’s lips. He and others in the region had pooled their resources to bring the French soil analyst to their region to help accentuate their chosen leading grape – not to diminish its importance by coming out of left field. But Duncan is a man who listens and he has since replanted parts of the small Morrison Vineyard in Lowburn with white grape varieties. He also retains Pinot Noir on the vineyard and it is consistently the pinnacle of his Pinots, but then again, the Riesling from this site is an outstanding wine with the potential to age for at least a decade. It’s a dry style with the same hallmark of the Morrison Vineyard as the Pinot Noir – a firmness on the finish of each sip, says Duncan.

I obviously need to taste a lot more of these wines (there are worst tasks) to pinpoint that characteristic in a blind tasting, but I can see his point. And I plan to get better acquainted with these wines because they consistently shine, for me, in both blind and non-blind tastings.

Duncan has also launched a new brand into New Zealand this week – it’s called Ted. And it includes a rose, a Pinot Blanc and  Pinot Noir. This range is mostly destined to bars, cafes and restaurants. Check out the wines.

Taste these Mount Edward wines…

 

2014 Mount Edward Morrison Vineyard Pinot Noir  

Arock star of a wine; picked earlier than in the past by two or three weeks to retain acidity, which drives the core of the dark cherry flavours in this intensely concentrated Pinot Noir. Whole bunch fermentation is big in this wine but it’s nicely integrated so that the flavours are fruit and savoury with a fresh, intense grip on the finish. It is certified organic with Bio-Gro New Zealand.

 

2017 Ted by Mount Edward Rose 

Light in colour, high in acid, very fresh and very youthful with a dry fruity style.

 

2016 Mount Edward Rose

Less fruit driven and more textural – a little more lees time adds weight and interesting texture to this wine.

 

2016 Ted Pinot Blanc

Lovely dry white, nice lees work adds texture to this wine’s refreshing citrusy flavours. It’s one of only three Otago Pinot Blancs.

 

2015 Mount Edward Morrison Riesling 12%

Extremely tasty; extremely low pH means this southern white will age superbly for the long haul (up to and probably beyond a decade) but it also drinks nicely now, thanks to notes of lime, lemon grass and green apples. But I’d keep it… cellar for at least two to three years.

And then there’s the orange wine – 2015 Mount Edward Clockwork Orange, which is a blend of Pinot Gris and Riesling blend; 8 months on skins and another year in barrel and then the trick, says Duncan, is at least another year of bottle aging. There are some nice floral aromatics in here; pretty and textural.

 

 

The Mount Edward Gamay is also a star, but made in tiny quantities. 

Can Cloudy Bay make New Zealand Pinot as famous as Sauvignon Blanc?

Can Cloudy Bay make New Zealand Pinot Noir as successful as Sauvignon Blanc?

The question sprang to mind last week at a tasting held at Cloudy Bay HQ on Jackson’s Road, Blenheim. This was not just any old tasting. We were tasting bottles of great wines with enormous price tags from all over the world, alongside their far humbler priced Cloudy Bay Pinot Noirs.

So, what was the point of the tasting?

Cloudy Bay senior winemaker Tim Heath said he wanted to compare and contrast his Pinots with great reds from around the world – and he wasn’t  mucking around.

The full list of wines appears at the end but my stand outs were:

2011 Vega Sicilia Valbuena Ribera del Duero ***** (5 stars)

Spain’s most famous red or merely its most seductive? Not that there’s anything ‘mere’ about this powerful wine, which  puts Cabernet Sauvignon’s most commanding foot forward here, only it’s riper, rounder and more approachable than Cab’ Sauv’ can usually hope to be. And speaking of feet, it has one in both the traditional camp – it’s blended with Merlot and Malbec – as well as the maverick one; it also contains the characterful red fruit appeal of Tempranillo (known as Tinto Fino in the Ribera del Duero region). It was aged in both old and new oak and the grapes were grown at relatively high altitude in this warm region, which accounts for the retention of acidity, which freshens this big red. It has enormous potential to age and was my star of the tasting.

 2009 Sori San Lorenzo from Piemonte ***** (5 stars)

When first made in 1967, this became the first cru Barbaresco ever produced by Italy’s modern wine pioneer, Angelo Gaja, who named it after its location – sori means hilltop with a southern exposure and that tastes like it works a treat for the late ripening, Nebbiolo grape, which is paradoxically delicate and intense (floral, a touch of tar, smoked meat, red fruit, full body, high acid, long finish, another seductive red). It was also the best wine with the food , due to its high acidity cutting a delicious path through the cheese, the salad and even the salmon that I ate after the tasting when we were able to re-try the wines at lunch.

2011 August Clape Cornas **** (4 stars)

This is like super concentrated teen angst; it needs time to chill out before it’s ready to socialise. It’s all about earthy flavours, tar, black olives and pepper with loads of everything (tannin, acid, super dry, full body). It was made using wild yeasts, was aged for 20 months in old oak then bottled unfined and unfiltered. It was not my fave to drink right now, but it’s impossible not to be impressed with the depth, length, body and all that jazz.

2013 Domaine Dujac Clos de la Roche Grand Cru **** (4 stars)

Made from grapes that were organically grown and taken from a Grand Cru vineyard, but more revealingly, it has a high percentage of whole bunch fermentation, which tasted intensely stalky, but provided impressive concentration, which seemed to dominate the delicacy that I look for in Pinot Noir. It’s an impeccable wine, although its style polarised the room.

2014 Cloudy Bay Pinot Noir  ***** (5 stars)

This is the best Cloudy Bay Pinot Noir I have ever tasted and it’s not the first time it’s made an outstanding impression on me in a blind tasting. It is made from 3 vineyard sites: Mustang in the Southern Valleys, Barracks planted in 2004 and the Delta Vineyard acquired by Cloudy Bay in 2013. About 15% of the wine went through whole bunch fermentation and there is no oak evident on the palate, which has clearly benefited from the intentional oxidative maturation that well used oak aging can bring to wine.

Winemaker Tim Heath says this: “We’ve worked really hard on the use of oak over the past four or five years. That, and our focus on how many whole bunches to include in the fermentation of Pinot Noir have been such an obsession that I needed to take a mental break from after our extensive trials. The aim is to make a Pinot that benefits from both, but doesn’t scream of those winemaking bells and whistles.”

2014 Cloudy Bay Te Wahi Pinot Noir **** (4 stars)

This wine is made from a 50/50 blend of grapes which it purchases from the Calvert Vineyard and grown on the Northburn Station Vineyard, which it now owns. And while it is elegant, fresh and full bodied, it says far more about Pinot Noir than the first Te Wahi (made in 2010) ever did, thanks a significant reduction in the use of whole bunches  in the fermentation. This is a beauty; all red fruit, elegance, a lively style and long finish. A keeper and it drinks very nicely right now.

The aim of the Cloudy Bay Pinot Salon 

This was New Zealand’s first Pinot Salon – a curious name for an event focussed on many wines that weren’t even made from the tricky old, oversensitive, thin skinned, Pinot Noir grape.

The Pinot Salon has replaced the annual Pinot at Cloudy Bay event, which was held annually until 2015 when the salons were launched in London. Senior winemaker Tim Heath and viticulturist Jim White have hosted salons in London and Tokyo and have more planned around the world. This year’s was the first time it has been held in New Zealand.

Cloudy Bay’s new Estate Director, Yang Shen, also attended the event and is pictured standing in the following picture:

“Cloudy Bay first planted Pinot Noir in Marlborough in 1985, and released the first vintage in 1989. Since then we have acquired some of the finest Pinot Noir vineyards in Marlborough, and more recently in Central Otago where we are continuing to refine our style,” said Shen, who is a trained winemaker in his own right.

The tasting was co-hosted by New Zealand’s sole Master Sommelier, Cameron Douglas, and all wines were tasted blind.

The wines tasted  

2011 Auguste Clape Cornas – Rhone Valley

2014 Domaine Cedric Chignard, Fleurie, Les Moriers – Beaujolais

2013 Domaine Dujac, Clos de la Roche, Grand Cru – Burgundy

2013 Domaine de Montille, Volnay, “En Champans”, 1er Cru – Burgundy

2013 Domaine Sylvain Cathiard, Nuits-St Georges, Aux Thorey, 1er Cru – Burgundy

2009 Rene Rostaing, Cote Rotie “Ampodium” – Rhone Valley

2011 Vega Sicilia Valbuena 5° – Ribera del Duero

2009 Gaja Sori San Lorenzo Langhe – Piedmont

2005 Cloudy Bay Pinot Noir Magnum – Marlborough

2010 Te Wahi – Central Otago

2014 Cloudy Bay Pinot Noir – Marlborough

2014 Te Wahi – Central Otago

Older posts

© 2017 Vino

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑